TedXMac 2017: Sara DeVries, What’s next for libraries


Sara DeVries, What’s next for libraries

  • libraries used to be the place that collected and shared learning and stories
  • the digital age has allowed everyone to be able to share their stories
  • the local librarian is a digital navigator for all of us
  • as a society we are losing connection with our neighbors
  • “We don’t know each other”
  • the library is a currated collection of global knowledge available to the local community
  • What if the libraries became the publisher of the community to share with the world? Examples:
    • Nuestra Comunidad Hispana: collecting, sharing, honoring, and preserving the stories of local Hispanics – these stories can be checked out from the library
    • Lakeland Library has a seed library as a result of working with individuals in the community who had a large amount of knowledge about heirloom seeds
    • libraries can help us share knowledge
    • Human Library “Books” – participants can check out a human who has a particular story to share
  • Try it out:
    • My name is…
    • I am passionate about…
    • My work in this community is…
  • We all hold valuable stories. Tell your story.
  • “Your story has power and you are the only one who can tell it.”

TedXMac 2017: Jack Johnson, The Importance of Perspective

Jack Johnson, The Importance of Perspective

  • 1898’s was when the first car, “Gasoline Carriage”, came to west Michigan
  • large automotive economic platform in West Michigan (more than 150 companies in local chamber)
  • what is the next economic platform?
    • AES “Advanced Energy Storage”
    • more products are battery powered
  • limiting views
    • we currently think of batteries in a limited way, consider it more like an engine
    • there are many types of lithium ion batteries
      • lithium ion phosphate
      • nickel manganese cobalt
      • nickel cobalt aluminum
      • lithium titanium oxide
      • etc.
  • The market is growing to be a $40 billion and is currently growing at double digit rates
  • innovation in West Michigan from many organizations and companies with research, manufacturing, and services
    • Michigan State University Bioeconomy Institute
    • Volta Power Systems
    • Midwest Energy Group
  • what’s next
    • learn – it isn’t what you have been told – look at doing things in new ways with batteries
    • invest – opportunity is everywhere – invest time and energy to look at creative applications

TedXMac 2017: Sarah Morin & Will Lowry, The Future of High School Education


Sarah Morin & Will Lowry, The Future of High School Education

  • High Schools lack direct purpose to life outside of the classroom
  • AP classes are no longer a differentiator (4 million AP tests taken this past year)
  • independent study could be a solution
    • study outside of a classroom in the community
    • only 3.45% of local students participate in independent study
    • re-frame what an independent study is and turn it into a differentiator
    • business leaders should take initiative to give students an opportunity to work with them
    • many students are leaving the state of Michigan because they are not connected to local businesses
    • schools should be open to having students leave campus to work in businesses
  • what’s next
    • high schoolers need to believe in themselves
    • the community needs to believe in the potential of our students

TedXMac 2017: Dirk Hughes, Bee Keeping


Dirk Hughes, Bee Keeping

  • “You can help the world by keeping bees.”
  • distinct roles of bees in a hive:
    • queen lays eggs
    • male drones mate
    • thousands of female worker bees do all the work: construction, repair, cleaning, defense, raising young, forging, making honey
  • benefits
    • honey and bees wax are useful
    • honey improves health
    • pollination of plants (food for animals and people) more bees = more food
    • bee keeping is meditative
  • how to get started (less than $500 to start with 1 hour per week per hive)
    • reach out to local bee keeper association (Holland area bee keepers association)
    • build or purchase an appropriate hive (top bar hive or land
    • pick appropriate location for hive and follow local ordinances
    • get bees
  • “more food, healthier lives, and a healthier planet”
  • “Help the world by keeping bees”

Healed and Healing

I wrote this article for the eNews from Fellowship Church of Holland, MI

We sang a song this past Sunday called “All Ye Refugees.” The following words, in particular, keep circling in my mind:

Oh refugee, I did not cast you out
In death and broken ground, Salvation springs
My body and my blood, the healing that you need
Come and receive

Welcome home, gather round
all ye refugees, come in.

It is sung by Sandra McCracken. You can listen to the song here.

The word refugee has it roots in the word refuge. A refugee is one who is seeking refuge. In our current context we think of people throughout the world who might be oppressed and seeing refuge in America or other countries.

Spiritually, many in our world are seeking refuge from pain, hurt, and struggles. The good news, as we heard from Pastor Brian, is that the gospel provides refuge and healing. This message is that God came to this world as a human to carry all of our burdens, brokenness, anxieties, fears, and sickness in order to conquer them once and for all. Yes, we still face challenges, but we no longer face them alone or in hopelessness.

This time of year is always a reminder to me of what it is like to be in a place of brokenness. My brother passed away on January 28, 1996. This happened after his body rejected lungs from a transplant he received that was supposed to bring him new life from his Cystic Fibrosis. It was a time of darkness and mourning as I cried out to God with pain and wondering on why he didn’t heal my brother. In this pain, God changed me and transformed me. I would not wish this type of challenge on anyone. At the same time, God has somehow strengthened me, given me peace, and changed how I view others and the world.

I pray that you might experience His peace that passes all understanding and that you might be healed from whatever pain you are experiencing so you can proclaim, like David in Psalm 30:11-12

You did it: you changed wild lament
into whirling dance;
You ripped off my black mourning band
and decked me with wildflowers.
I’m about to burst with song;
I can’t keep quiet about you.
God, my God,
I can’t thank you enough. (The Message)

This is the good news of the gospel and it isn’t just for us. Let’s share it with our neighbors and the world. If you haven’t experienced this for yourself and want to learn more, please reach out to any of the staff at Fellowship or others in the congregation.

Welcome home, gather round
all ye refugees, come in.

Where do you need healing?
How have you received healing?
Where might God be asking you to provide healing to others?

## The Art of Working Together – Alan Mulally #GLS2016 Session 2

The Art of Working Together – Alan Mulally #GLS2016 Session 2

It is important to place people first and work together to see and share problems in order to solve them by working together. To do this, use data and information to see current reality. Healthy teams need to be able to hold 2 things in tension at the same time:

  • Deal with reality
  • Have a plan to deal with it

Consider using the colors red, yellow, and green when sharing goals and monitoring all aspects of a project.

The Lenses of Leadership – Bill Hybels #GLS2016 Session 1


The Lenses of Leadership – Bill Hybels #GLS2016 Session 1
There are four lens’ of leadership that require the attention and are the responsibility of the leader:

  • Passion (red framed glasses): Keep passion alive in your spirit because it is infectious. Read materials that ignite passion, be around people with passion, and go to places that inspire passion.
  • Culture (shattered lens glasses): Care about people because God cares about people. Feedback is very important so don’t shy away from doing it and building it into the culture.
  • Goals (adjustable lens glasses): Watch out for too many or too few goals in an organization. Pay attention and keep adjusting.
  • Legacy (glasses with rear-view lens attached): Look at your past to see where most of your energy has been spent. Align your energy with how you want to be remembered. Start now!

Enough?

This is an article I wrote for the February 17, 2016 newsletter for Fellowship Reformed Church

For the past few months I’ve been on a quest to remove clutter from my life. I believe the reason for my desire to see things clean, orderly, and simple is because I will have to move out of my office at Fellowship by the end of April. This is something we, as a staff, will all be doing so the construction crews can start the office expansion and renovation. In this process, I’m seeing all of the piles of papers that need to be filed or shredded and the books that need to be sorted and donated. Sometimes this feels overwhelming and other times it makes me sad. The sadness comes from realizing all of the hopes and dreams that are tied up in objects. Some of the books look really great, yet I haven’t read them. Some of the papers might hold secret treasures that would have helped me make a better decision. As I write these words, I realize even more clearly how much energy all of these possessions and clutter take from me. Peter Walsh, author of many books about organization, has this to say about clutter:

“It means anything that stands between you and the vision you have for your best life. It could be a pile of inherited furniture or a jumble of kids’ toys all over the living room. But it could also be the constant self-doubt that creeps into your decision-making, anger about how you’re treated at work, shame about your weight or looks, or a tendency to respond defensively and critically when your spouse challenges you. Whatever the case, you have to ask yourself, “Does this item or thought or response move me closer to my vision for my best life?” If it does, great. If it doesn’t, what is it doing in your life?”

This past Sunday, Marlin Vis shared the story from Mark 10:17-31 about how a really good guy, who happened to have a lot of stuff, came to Jesus and asked what it would take to receive eternal life. Jesus tells him to remove the clutter because it is standing between him and what is best for his life. OK, I’m paraphrasing, but doesn’t this sound a bit like what Peter Walsh said in the previous paragraph? I hate to put Peter Walsh and Jesus in the same paragraph, but also recognize that both are speaking truth about the hold clutter and possessions can have on us.

So what might we receive when giving up those things that have a hold on our lives? Marlin shared two guarantees about what we receive when we choose Jesus over stuff:

  1. We will have enough (When we have more than enough, we share it with those in our community who don’t have enough).
  2. We will be made well.

I don’t know how this sounds to you, but it makes me feel energized to stop holding onto the security of clutter and start holding onto the promises of God. Enough! I need to go recycle some papers.

Trained vs. Untrained

I recently attended a safety and security presentation. One particular element that I found particularly interesting was how trained vs. untrained people respond during a crisis. It looks like the original source for the information is from the Center for Personal Protection and Safety

trained-vs-untrained

As you can see, the path for trained and untrained start in the same way but then take very different paths. It made me wonder about how these play out in all of our non-life threatening situations.

When I’m stuck, do I commit to action or descend into helplessness? Conversely, is it possible that when I’m feeling helpless I might need to respond with action?

Trust in His Story

My family and I have been catching up on Star Wars over this Christmas break. Yes, we even have Star Wars pajamas and a BB-8 (a small robot in the new Star Wars movie) stuffed toy for our dog. Seeing the movie on opening night a few weeks back left us feeling a wide variety of emotions. J.J. Abrams, the co-writer and director of the film, has said that the key for the film was to return to the roots of the first Star Wars film and for the story to be based more on emotion than explanation (here). We thoroughly enjoyed the adventure the movie took us on, but at the same time there were many moments that made us long for a resolution and feel sad. At the end, even with this mixture of feelings, we celebrated that there would be additional movies coming in the future where we could have confidence that the story would resolve and where good would conquer evil.
This past Sunday Pastor Janelle Koolhaas shared how we can have confidence in God’s everlasting story (listen here). She shared how Simeon and Anna, both in old age, were at the temple waiting to meet the Messiah (Luke 2:25-38). They were able to meet him as a baby but did not get to live to see Him live, die, and rise again. They only saw part of the story but knew that God would be faithful to deliver His people as he promised.

We, too, often do not see the whole story but have a unique story that fits perfectly into God’s plans. We find in His word, the Bible, that His timing is not slow or mistaken. Many times we may feel confused or broken but we can rest assured that our story belongs, is valid, and fits right in. In those times we can also take comfort by trusting in God’s story and what He has done, is doing, and will do.

Often, in my work at Fellowship and my personal life, I find it helpful to step back from challenging situations and attempt to look at things with God eyes and in light of His bigger story. I wonder things like:

  • What makes the timing right for this to have happened?
  • What happened in the past that equips us perfectly for this situation?
  • Who has God called into the story at this time and why?
  • What is the best possible outcome that would show God’s faithfulness?
  • How has God equipped me to have a positive impact?

You can probably think of other questions that allow you to see things from God’s perspective. Ultimately, this is a way we can show our faith in Him. This makes me think of a gift my daughter painted for me this Christmas. It has words about faith from Hebrews 11:1-3 (NLT):

“(1) Faith is the confidence that what we hope for will actually happen; it gives us assurance about things we cannot see. (2) Through their faith, the people in days of old earned a good reputation. (3) By faith we understand that the entire universe was formed at God’s command, that what we now see did not come from anything that can be seen.”

I find great assurance in these words and have great hope for what God has done, is doing, and will do. You might also find comfort and assurance in reading and praying the following words from Psalm 146 over the coming days as an act of faith, hope, and love in being a part of God’s story:

1 Praise the Lord! Praise the Lord, O my soul!
2 I will praise the Lord as long as I live; I will sing praises to my God all my life long.
3 Do not put your trust in princes, in mortals, in whom there is no help.
4 When their breath departs, they return to the earth; on that very day their plans perish.
5 Happy are those whose help is the God of Jacob, whose hope is in the Lord their God,
6 who made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them; who keeps faith forever;
7 who executes justice for the oppressed; who gives food to the hungry. The Lord sets the prisoners free;
8 the Lord opens the eyes of the blind. The Lord lifts up those who are bowed down; the Lord loves the righteous.
9 The Lord watches over the strangers; he upholds the orphan and the widow, but the way of the wicked he brings to ruin.
10 The Lord will reign forever, your God, O Zion, for all generations. Praise the Lord!